4 Key Benefits from Using Self-Service for IBM MQ – Part 2 of 3

4 Key Benefits from Using Self-Service for IBM MQ - Part 2 of 3[This is Part 2 of a 3 part series. Catch-up with part 1, here.]

Drivers for MQ Self-Service

In Part I, we discussed the extensive interest in MQ Self-Service.  This interest is due to a number of factors, including:  the shrinking size of middleware staff, growing workloads and increasing application complexity.

At the same time application complexity rises, the demand for MQ access grows accordingly.  The number of  application developers,  IT support and operations personnel needing access to MQ is increasing and they all come to the middleware group to get help.

There are a variety of use cases that are common within most enterprises. Understanding the typical business requirements to reduce support costs and stakeholder necessities for increased visibility, message browsing and the taking of actions is essential in providing   an effective self-service system.

Typical Requirements for MQ Self-Service  

  • Visibility Anywhere: View queue status and depth, channel usage via web
  • Testing: Examine queues, channels, queue managers, and subscriptions
  • Forensics: Browse and manipulate application messages
  • Action: Act on application specific messages (move, copy, edit, route, replay, create)

Crafting an Effective Self-Service Solution

How do you go about crafting an effective self-service solution for IBM MQ?  Many organizations use IBM’s MQ Explorer. After all, why not? It comes out of the box with the product so that is certainly an option. The product has all the characteristics that you need to manage and view in the MQ environment; however, it can be challenging to use for problem diagnosis.  Some of the requirements when using MQ Explorer do not meet the objectives that we identified:

MQ Explorer is lacking:

  • Simplicity: You need to install an Eclipse client and set the appropriate security level to give access. This may end up exposing the complexity of MQ requiring tool users to have a solid understanding of MQ or they will be lost. There will be difficulties to enable non-specialists to complete their tasks.
  • Scalability: Trying to roll out the MQ Explorer to hundreds or thousands of users is challenging for most organizations as it is a manual task.
  • Security & Audit: You end up giving people more capability that you want to give them. Users can potentially see and do more than what is needed. This can be dangerous.

The Better Approach to Self Service

First, start off with a self-service monitoring dashboard which provides stakeholders a business view of MQ:

  • Activity
  • Availability
  • Performance

Teams acquire an end-to-end view of application flows through all the moving parts that make up a workflow.

Next, provide users with real-time application visibility for instant awareness of performance problems. Standard web-enabled dashboards do not typically supply this.  Users will have the capabilities to understand what is happening within MQ as they need it to understand their situation. Problem resolution time shrinks, too.  When a problem occurs, instead of calling up the middleware team to say something like “I think MQ is broken,” the user can now describe the issue that they are experiencing and place it into a business context for rapid remediation.

Then, provide deep-dive visibility. Many users do not have this insight into how MQ impacts application performance & behavior.  This approach to MQ self-service is very empowering for the user as it enables them to better understand how middleware behaves.  Stakeholders get the opportunity to participate actively and proactively diagnose situations where issues might occur. In return, this helps the team prevent situations from reoccurring.  Once deep visibility is provided for stakeholders, productivity improves.

Finally, we come to taking action. When talking about self-service, we are not merely considering how users view objects.  We are also covering how users take action to improve the situation.  Make it simple for users to understand the necessary procedures that are available to them. Help them choose the right action to perform, through effective communication in a format that is brief, easy to understand and one that enables a quick user response.

To learn more, read Part 3 of this 3 part series, “4 Key Benefits from using Self-Service for IBM MQ” and learn how users can take actions when provided with a graphical historical view on middleware performance. Find out what the key most important metrics are, how to interpret the metrics and when to invoke actions.

For more information on how you can improve productivity, increase speed of delivery to customers and reduce costs, watch the TechTalk Boost Productivity using Self-Service for IBM MQ!

4 Key Benefits from Using Self-Service for IBM MQ” Part 1 of 3

4 Key Benefits from Using Self-Service for IBM MQ" Part 1 of 3The concept of self-service has evolved over many years.  It has led to very important innovations and technology in many industries in the way we work and live.  Until the earliest 20th century, people who went shopping were entirely dependent on clerks.  They would go to a store and give a list of items that they needed to the clerk and those people selected their bits for them. Naturally shopping has changed dramatically with innovations such as supermarkets, malls and even today, internet shopping. When the first ATMs were introduced, there was a lot of fear in the part of banking organizations that customers would miss human interaction with their bank tellers. That fear went away when it became clear that these machines were a huge success.

The Benefits to Self-Service:

Human Empowerment: Users with self-service systems are able to do things for themselves that previously required help from a specialists.

Increased Efficiency: People are now able to do more with less by delegating some activities to users.  This enables a more economical use of resources.

Improved Productivity: With self-service, the specialists that we rely upon are now free to perform other tasks that deliver greater value to the organization. Also, user wait time has decreased.

Reduced Costs: Time consuming tasks that were previously performed by specialists are now delegated to users which has a great impact on reducing costs.

Essential Design Criteria for Self-Service:

Despite all of these benefits, there is an essential design criteria that we cannot forget about when talking about self-service.  You want to provide the benefits of ease of use to your end-users but the first and foremost criteria is protection and the well-being of the user.

Safety: All self-service systems focus primarily on protecting the underlying system of many issues that can either intentionally or unintentionally be created by the non-specialist. Protecting the integrity of the underlying system while still delivering the self-service benefit to the user.

Security:  Only the users can do what they are authorized to do.  Automatic teller machines and atms are the best examples.

Simplicity: Self-service users may have little or no training so the users have to be intuitive and must guide the users to do the right actions.

Scalability: The Self Service system has to be able to handle an increasing volume of the consumers. Self-service often leads to a high level of adoption to users than what was originally anticipated when these systems were put into use.

Self Service System for IBM MQ

A self-service system for IBM MQ has a number of potential stakeholders.  Naturally, these are the people in the middleware team but there are also other groups to consider that are involved with MQ monitoring as well.

Middleware team: Focused on proactive management of messaging middleware. They want to manage their environment

Application Support: Interested in faster time to repair (MTTR).  They want to identify the root cause of performance issues

Application Developers: Interested in continuous quality improvement of the new releases of the applications.

Enterprise Architects and Application Owners: Interesting in processing improving and reduce costs. They want to prevent performance problems from happening.  They also want to monitor their applications from end to end.

Application support, DevOps, and operations teams can have direct access to WMQ, test messages in development and quickly find the root-cause of production problems—without needing to call the Middleware Team. They do not need to know the internal mechanics of MQ in order to do their jobs effectively so their understanding of the internal mechanics of MQ is relatively limited. Since most of these stakeholders are not specialists in MQ, it is not surprising if they frequently contact their middleware team with inaccurate observations or questions such as: “MQ is broken, can you fix it?”, “MQ is slow,”  “I need a new queue so I can do some testing,” or “I need to be able to run tests.”  They can also rely on the MQ Specialists, the middleware team to address their issues if need be.

A fundamental ingredient to a successful self-service implementation is the act of delegating a specific set of selected activities to a broader group of people.  Middleware Teams can leverage easy-to-implement technology to empower their colleagues in application support, DevOps, and operations and also save themselves a boatload of time. Understanding the common requirements and user demands of these stakeholders is the key to providing them with an effective self-service system.

To learn more, read Part 2 of this 3 part series, “4 Key Benefits from using Self-Service for IBM MQ” and learn why there is so much interest in the self-service topic and typical user requirements for self-service for MQ.

For more information on how you can improve productivity, increase speed of delivery to customers and reduce costs, watch the TechTalk Boost Productivity using Self-Service for IBM MQ!

Rewarding Impatience with User Self-Service

Rewarding Impatience with User Self-Service

There seems to be a direct correlation between how successful business professionals are and their level of impatience. While I am not familiar with any studies on this particular subject, it is simple logic that the most productive employees are those who most frequently demand rapid response to service requests.

Read the source article at EMA Blog Community

Original Author: Steve Brasen

Self-service, the DIY for WebSphere

DIY or do it yourself for WebSphere MQ (WMQ)

 

The DIY (do it yourself) movement while ageless, is experiencing a rising tide of popularity possibly due the economy’s lethargic performance.  You can judge it’s popularity yourself, just based on the number of cable channels dedicated to building anything from a bookshelf to an entire new house.  Homeowners needing to do more with less take on tasks that previously they would have called in an expert or specialist to do.  With a little help from the DIY channels, they get the job done.   What about IT Ops and DevOps?  While company profits have increased, the budget’s for many IT teams has remained flat. And yet, there is still work to do. The concept of “self-service” is the IT world’s answer to DIY.  One area needing self-service is WebSphere management and monitoring.

Continue reading

Join Nastel at Gartner Symposium

Visit with Nastel at Gartner Symposium booth #404Nastel will be in booth #404 at Gartner Symposium/ITxpo 2013, October 7th – 10th.  Please stop by our booth, #404 to enter a drawing for a Tablet, spin our wheel and try to win some cool prizes and talk to our experts on Application Performance Monitoring (APM).

We will demonstrate AutoPilot’s capabilities for Self-service, Preemptive Analytics for APM and real-time compliance monitoring.  In addition we have new version of our UI we would love to show you that was specially designed to run on mobile devices. And we have some new customer wins we would be happy to tell you about.

We hope to see you at the show!