Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence will help determine if you get your next job

Nastel Technologies®
December 13, 2019

AI is being used to attract applicants and to predict a candidate’s fit for a position. But is it up to the task?

With parents using artificial intelligence to scan prospective babysitters’ social media and an endless slew of articles explaining how your résumé can “beat the bots,” you might be wondering whether a robot will be offering you your next job.

We’re not there yet, but recruiters are increasingly using AI to make the first round of cuts and to determine whether a job posting is even advertised to you. Often trained on data collected about previous or similar applicants, these tools can cut down on the effort recruiters need to expend in order to make a hire. Last year, 67 percent of hiring managers and recruiters surveyed by LinkedIn said AI was saving them time.

But critics argue that such systems can introduce bias, lack accountability and transparency, and aren’t guaranteed to be accurate. Take, for instance, the Utah-based company HireVue, which sells a job interview video platform that can use artificial intelligence to assess candidates and, it claims, predict their likelihood to succeed in a position. The company says it uses on-staff psychologists to help develop customized assessment algorithms that reflect the ideal traits for a particular role a client (usually a company) hopes to hire for, like a sales representative or computer engineer.

That algorithm is then used to analyze how individual candidates answer preselected questions in a recorded video interview, grading their verbal responses and, in some cases, facial movements. HireVue claims the tool — which is used by about 100 clients, including Hilton and Unilever — is more predictive of job performance than human interviewers conducting the same structured interviews.

But last month, lawyers at the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), a privacy rights nonprofit, filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, pushing the agency to investigate the company for potential bias, inaccuracy, and lack of transparency. It also accused HireVue of engaging in “deceptive trade practices” because the company claims it doesn’t use facial recognition. (EPIC argues HireVue’s facial analysis qualifies as facial recognition.)

The lawsuit follows the introduction of the Algorithmic Accountability Act in Congress earlier this year, which would grant the FTC authority to create regulations to check so-called “automated decision systems” for bias. Meanwhile, the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) — the federal agency that deals with employment discrimination — is reportedly now investigating at least two discrimination cases involving job decision algorithms, according to Bloomberg Law.

AI can pop up throughout the recruitment and hiring process

Recruiters can make use of artificial intelligence throughout the hiring process, from advertising and attracting potential applicants to predicting candidates’ job performance. “Just like with the rest of the world’s digital advertisement, AI is helping target who sees what job descriptions [and] who sees what job marketing,” explains Aaron Rieke, a managing director at Upturn, a DC-based nonprofit digital technology research group.

And it’s not just a few outlier companies, like HireVue, that use predictive AI. Vox’s own HR staff use LinkedIn Recruiter, a popular tool that uses artificial intelligence to rank candidates. Similarly, the jobs platform ZipRecruiter uses AI to match candidates with nearby jobs that are potentially good fits, based on the traits the applicants have shared with the platform — like their listed skills, experience, and location — and previous interactions between similar candidates and prospective employers. For instance, because I applied for a few San Francisco-based tutoring gigs on ZipRecruiter last year, I’ve continued to receive emails from the platform advertising similar jobs in the area.

Overall, the company says its AI has trained on more than 1.5 billion employer-candidate interactions.

Platforms like Arya — which says it’s been used by Home Depot and Dyson — go even further, using machine learning to find candidates based on data that might be available on a company’s internal database, public job boards, social platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn, and other profiles available on the open web, like those on professional membership sites.

Arya claims it’s even able to predict whether an employee is likely to leave their old job and take a new one, based on the data it collects about a candidate, such as their promotions, movement between previous roles and industries, and the predicted fit of a new position, as well as data about the role and industry more broadly.

Another use of AI is to screen through application materials, like résumés and assessments, in order to recommend which candidates recruiters should contact first. Somen Mondal, the CEO and co-founder of one such screening and matching service, Ideal, says these systems do more than automatically search résumés for relevant keywords.

This article originally appeared on vox.com To read the full article and see the images, click here.

Nastel Technologies uses machine learning to detect anomalies, behavior and sentiment, accelerate decisions, satisfy customers, innovate continuously.  To answer business-centric questions and provide actionable guidance for decision-makers, Nastel’s AutoPilot® for Analytics fuses:

  • Advanced predictive anomaly detection, Bayesian Classification and other machine learning algorithms
  • Raw information handling and analytics speed
  • End-to-end business transaction tracking that spans technologies, tiers, and organizations
  • Intuitive, easy-to-use data visualizations and dashboards

Nastel Technologies is the global leader in Integration Infrastructure Management (i2M). It helps companies achieve flawless delivery of digital services powered by integration infrastructure by delivering Middleware Management, Monitoring, Tracking, and Analytics to detect anomalies, accelerate decisions, and enable customers to constantly innovate, to answer business-centric questions, and provide actionable guidance for decision-makers. It is particularly focused on IBM MQ, Apache Kafka, Solace, TIBCO EMS, ACE/IIB and also supports RabbitMQ, ActiveMQ, Blockchain, IOT, DataPower, MFT and many more.

 

The Nastel i2M Platform provides:

  • Secure self-service configuration management with auditing for governance & compliance
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  • Integration with ITSM/SIEM solutions including ServiceNow, Splunk, & AppDynamics

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