Cloud Computing Is Awesome. But Not Always.

Cloud Computing – In aviation, being “in the clouds” is a universal flight condition referring to a pilot’s inability to see the ground.

It’s also a common lament of parents about the troubling coordinates of a teenager’s head, which might seem to be “in the clouds.”

In the 21st century, “in the cloud” is a reference that has established itself in the marketplace vernacular as the interaction and delivery point between providers of “cloud-based” digital applications and customers.

Cloud computing is the availability of incremental processing power that resides on an application provider’s servers, instead of your hard drive. For example, community-building technology, like social media platforms. When you post something on Facebook, you’re in the cloud. When you conduct online banking, sell a stock, or hail an Uber from your smartphone, you’re doing that in the cloud. If you use Google’s G Suite of office products, or Microsoft Office 365, all are cloud-based.

No question, cloud computing is another example of technology increasing business efficiencies and leverage. And for small businesses, it’s been a godsend, because it not only gives us access to Big Business-like leverage, it’s also offered at an incremental price that fits our diminutive budgets.

But like all high-tech tools, there’s an associated balance sheet where lives the good and the not so much of any kind of leverage. And on the liability side of the ledger, cloud computing, which helps us reach more customers more efficiently and more elegantly, still has not replicated one of the most elemental components of humanity – the handshake.

This article originally appeared on forbes.com To read the full article, click here.

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