Going Beyond Machine Learning To Machine Reasoning

Going Beyond Machine Learning To Machine Reasoning

Going Beyond Machine Learning To Machine Reasoning

Machine Learning – The conversation around Artificial Intelligence usually revolves around technology-focused topics: machine learning, conversational interfaces, autonomous agents, and other aspects of data science, math, and implementation. However, the history and evolution of AI is more than just a technology story. The story of AI is also inextricably linked with waves of innovation and research breakthroughs that run headfirst into economic and technology roadblocks. There seems to be a continuous pattern of discovery, innovation, interest, investment, cautious optimism, boundless enthusiasm, realization of limitations, technological roadblocks, withdrawal of interest, and retreat of AI research back to academic settings. These waves of advance and retreat seem to be as consistent as the back and forth of sea waves on the shore.

This pattern of interest, investment, hype, then decline, and rinse-and-repeat is particularly vexing to technologists and investors because it doesn’t follow the usual technology adoption lifecycle. Popularized by Geoffrey Moore in his book “Crossing the Chasm”, technology adoption usually follows a well-defined path. Technology is developed and finds early interest by innovators, and then early adopters, and if the technology can make the leap across the “chasm”, it gets adopted by the early majority market and then it’s off to the races with demand by the late majority and finally technology laggards. If the technology can’t cross the chasm, then it ends up in the dustbin of history. However, what makes AI distinct is that it doesn’t fit the technology adoption lifecycle pattern.

But AI isn’t a discrete technology. Rather it’s a series of technologies, concepts, and approaches all aligning towards the quest for the intelligent machine. This quest inspires academicians and researchers to come up with theories of how the brain and intelligence works, and their concepts of how to mimic these aspects with technology. AI is a generator of technologies, which individually go through the technology lifecycle. Investors aren’t investing in “AI”, but rather they’re investing in the output of AI research and technologies that can help achieve the goals of AI. As researchers discover new insights that help them surmount previous challenges, or as technology infrastructure finally catches up with concepts that were previously infeasible, then new technology implementations are spawned and the cycle of investment renews.

The Need for Understanding

It’s clear that intelligence is like an onion (or a parfait) — many layers. Once we understand one layer, we find that it only explains a limited amount of what intelligence is about. We discover there’s another layer that’s not quite understood, and back to our research institutions we go to figure out how it works. In Cognilytica’s exploration of the intelligence of voice assistants, the benchmark aims to tease at one of those next layers: understanding. That is, knowing what something is — recognizing an image among a category of trained concepts, converting audio waveforms into words, identifying patterns among a collection of data, or even playing games at advanced levels, is different from actually understanding what those things are. This lack of understanding is why users get hilarious responses from voice assistant questions, and is also why we can’t truly get autonomous machine capabilities in a wide range of situations. Without understanding, there’s no common sense. Without common sense and understanding, machine learning is just a bunch of learned patterns that can’t adapt to the constantly evolving changes of the real world.

One of the visual concepts that’s helpful to understand these layers of increasing value is the “DIKUW Pyramid”:

This article originally appeared on forbes.com To read the full article and see the images, click here.

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