Tag: MQ

CX Makes This ‘CrossWorld’ Estate Sexy Again

CX Makes This ‘CrossWorld’ Estate Sexy Again

Almost exactly 19 years ago IBM acquired CrossWorlds Software to add to their WebSphere business-integration middleware business.  CrossWorlds was famous (or infamous) back then mainly because of its founder and approach to advertising, publicity and PR (public relations). 

Is Observability the New Monitoring?

Is Observability the New Monitoring?

Monitoring – Since rejoining Nastel, after a long period away in the cloud, I’ve been wondering why people are now talking about ‘observability’ when they used to talk about ‘monitoring’. Why is there a new term? A new piece of technical jargon. I’ve been reading up on it and it seems that each vendor describes it slightly differently, and amazingly that difference is the key feature that makes their product different to everyone else’s. Some are talking about Java byte code instrumentation, some are talking about the complete absence of instrumentation – inferring things from the outside, some talk about Artificial Intelligence, some about DevOps. Some think observability is seeing the end to end application whereas monitoring is seeing the low level IT.

A philosophical (possibly even a theological) discussion of IBM MQ’s maximum queue depth

A philosophical (possibly even a theological) discussion of IBM MQ’s maximum queue depth

I was having a discussion the other day about IBM MQ maximum queue depth. After thinking about this, I really got to thinking about why this exists. The basic concept for a queue is to hold messages the producers create until consumers can process them.

Need a way to reduce costs and improve application performance at the same time?

Need a way to reduce costs and improve application performance at the same time?

Application Performance – Much of the costs associated with implementing a new app or upgrading an existing app are operational. For most companies at least a quarter of their entire IT budget is aligned to integration and configuration management.

Performance Monitoring in the Cloud Age

Performance Monitoring in the Cloud Age

Cloud – Business applications have continued to become more complex, and the tools we all rely on to monitor performance have not always kept up.

Do you CD or LTS?

Do you CD or LTS?

It’s been four years since IBM MQ introduced Continuous Delivery (CD) and Long Term Support (LTS) releases. The main objective was to give MQ users a choice between getting access to the latest and greatest features sooner than later (CD) or using a stable environment that had only bug fixes (LTS).   Since the typical cadences…
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A brief overview of what’s new in IBM MQ 9.2

A brief overview of what’s new in IBM MQ 9.2

Recently, I wrote about the difference between long-term support and continuous delivery releases of IBM MQ. In that discussion I pointed out that based on their traditional cadence that a new MQ release was not far off. As expected, IBM has announced IBM MQ 9.2. This is scheduled for availability this week. As I discussed…
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Do you CD or LTS?

Do you CD or LTS?

It’s been four years since IBM MQ introduced Continuous Delivery (CD) and Long Term Support (LTS) releases. The main objective was to give MQ users a choice between getting access to the latest and greatest features sooner than later (CD) or using a stable environment that had only bug fixes (LTS). Since the typical cadences…
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Advances in technology solve problems while creating new ones

Advances in technology solve problems while creating new ones

Previously I wrote about the difference in technology today compared to when MQ first came out. One of the areas that is most notable is network speed and how that relates to I/O as well as reliability.   Not that long ago, you probably were saving changes to your Word or PowerPoint documents every few minutes…
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Next Window Please!

Next Window Please!

It is amazing how MQ has managed to stay relevant over all of these years. Looking back to when it first came out in the 1990’s, we were dealing with 2400 baud modems connected to remote locations running a number of different technologies, over spotty telephone lines using token ring protocols. Computing power of the…
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